Archives for April 2019

Learn to Brake—Don’t Be Afraid to Accelerate!

Braking Skills Build Confidence on a Motorcycle

afraid to accelerateIf you’re a relatively new rider, or maybe an experienced one getting back on the bike after an accident, one of the biggest hurdles to fully enjoying the experience a motorcycle offers is a reluctance to hit the throttle. It’s a feeling like nothing in the world, but a part of the rush is the knowledge of the inherent danger. It’s you and machine against the elements, and a single mistake can be devastating.

You may think that the way to overcome “acceleration anxiety” is to practice using the throttle. While it always helps to have a fine-tuned sense of how your throttle will respond, a better strategy will likely be to practice your braking. Here are some tips to get you started:

  • Be more willing to use your brakes—Too many riders ease off the throttle to slow down, rather than applying the brakes. That’s an inefficient way to lower your speed, with far less control than you’ll get from your brakes. However, if you’re going to use your brakes, you have to know how they’ll respond, and that takes practice. Go to a large parking lot or out for an easy ride in the country (where there will be little traffic) and practice always using your brakes to slow down. Your confidence will increase immediately.
  • Don’t jump on or clutch the brake—Many riders are afraid to brake because they do so too aggressively. Practice applying gentler, but more consistent, pressure to the brakes, so that your deceleration is more consistent. It’s also important to understand that the first squeeze on your brakes isn’t for reducing your speed—it’s to load the fork springs in a linear manner. If you squeeze only once, you won’t get maximum efficiency from your brakes.
  • Don’t simultaneously engage the front brake and the throttle—This is an old wives’ tale and not a good idea. Learn to shut the throttle before you brake and release the brake before you accelerate.

Contact Weber & Nierenberg

At Weber & Nierenberg, we bring more than 30 years of experience successfully handling personal injury claims to people throughout the state of California. For a free initial consultation, contact us by e-mail or call our office at 1-866-288-6010.

Scooter Enthusiasts Advocate for New Licensing and Regulation

Proponents Emphasize Safety Aspects

new licensing and regulationScooters and other electronic vehicles have taken the country by storm, but the reactions have been mixed. Some cities have banned them altogether or placed strict limits on the number of vendors and scooters in the community. Other municipalities have implemented extensive regulations regarding use and licensing.

The original electric motorbikes or scooters (now known somewhat colloquially as neighborhood electric vehicles (NEVS)) are designed to reach maximum speeds of about 25-30 miles per hour. New technology has led to the development of electric scooters that can go 45 mph or even faster.

Now, some e-bike advocates are calling for consideration of national regulation and/or licensing of two-wheeled electronic vehicles (EVs). They note that while cars, trucks and motorcycles all have national standards that must be met, the smaller EVs are mostly without regulation. Depending on the locality, the same two-wheeler might be classified (and regulated) as a bicycle, moped, electric bicycle, motorized bicycle or even a motorcycle. Vehicles that are legal in many states are outlawed in others.

Proponents of national regulation argue that it would create a clear set of safety standards that all manufacturers would have to meet. In addition, it would allow for the regulation of such vehicles according to their top rate of speed, with safety guidelines or requirements that correspond. They point to the current Department of Transportation and NHTSA certifications that apply to motorcycles, noting that those programs have prevented manufacturers from selling unsafe bikes in the United States.

Scooter advocates also propose a new type of license—an “urban electric motorbike” license. To obtain such a license, an applicant would need to complete safety and driving programs geared specifically to two-wheeled electronic vehicles.

Contact the Experienced Attorneys at Weber & Nierenberg

At Weber & Nierenberg, we have advocated for the rights of personal injury victims in California for more than 30 years, including people injured in motorcycle accidents. We’ll take the time to learn the unique aspects of your accident, as well as your needs, so that we can tailor our counsel to get the results you seek. Send us an e-mail or call our office at 1-866-288-6010 for a free initial consultation.

 
 
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